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vSphere 5 – Storage pt.2 vCloud and Vsphere Migrations

The point..

So on my last post I covered some things to think on when looking at the new VMFS-5 partitions. Obviously the point in moving to the new VMFS would be to gain all the benefits as explained in that previous post. One thing you will see in this post are just the types of migrations. I also want to highlight that I shared some resources on the bottom for those of you who may want to review some deeper highlights. Obviously there isn’t a ton of documentation out there highlighting this nor the special *features* for vSphere 5 (sVmotion issues??) that you may run into. So let hope I do this yet further justice. On to the blog!

Adding VMFS-5 to the vCloud

  1. Log in to vSphere and ensure you have a new LUN provisioned (covered above in how to:)
  2. Log into vCloud Director Web Interface and you must be an administrator.
  3. Click “System” tab and click on Provider VDC. Right click a PVDC and select “Open”
  4. After opening the PVDC select the Datastores Tab and then click the +/- button to add/remove datastores

  1. Browse through the datastores by clicking the > button or by searching in the top right. When you have located your datastore highlight it and then click the button then click “OK”. Disregard the warning.


(Note: the yellow highlights are ways you can search and browse through datastores. This is very handy when there are many to look through)


(Note: Highlight in yellow shows the datastore added successfully. This is a 20TB Datastore)

You will now see the datastore in the datastore summary tab for that PVDC

Migrating Virtual Machines for vCloud Director to the “new” VMFS-5 LUN.

  1. Make sure the vApp is NOT a linked clone. If it is a linked clone defer to the references below.
  2. Ensure the Datastore you want to Storage Motion the Virtual Machine to is also provisioned to the Org VDC. Do this by opening the Org vDC and selecting the “Datastores” Tab.

    Note: you can see both datastores are attached to this VDC with the organization known as App1

  3. You could then log-in to vSphere client with the following noted vCenter and perform a storage vMotion. Another way of doing a Storage vMotion could be by using William Lam’s script he wrote as well. (see references below)
  4. If you need to perform the sVmotion defer to the following method below.

NOTE: I would highly recommend that you roll out update 1 to all vCloud components. This addresses a few major fixes that will allow for operations to run more smoothly. More importantly, the only way to sVmotion vCloud VMs is to turn them off. This is a pretty common issue with vanilla vsphere 5/vcloud 1.5 roll outs. I also experienced this problem. For more information please see references at the bottom.

Migrate a Virtual Machine with Storage VMotion in vSphere

Use migration with Storage VMotion to relocate a virtual machine’s configuration file and virtual disks while the virtual machine is powered on. You cannot change the virtual machine’s execution host during a migration with Storage VMotion. (Note: that if VM is managed by vCloud and not at 1.5 update 1 you will need to possibly power off the virtual machine to perform the svmotion. If the virtual machine is a fast provisioned vm (linked clone) then you will need to perform the sVmotion through an API.

Procedure

  • Ensure you are not moving vCloud vApp if you are please follow the above process first.
  • Display the virtual machine you want to migrate in the inventory.
  • Right-click on the virtual machine, and select Migrate from the pop-up menu.
  • Select Change datastore and click Next.
  • Select a resource pool (the same) and click Next.
  • Select the destination datastore:
    To move the virtual machine configuration files and virtual disks to a single destination, select the datastore and click Next.
    To select individual destinations for the configuration file and each virtual disk, click Advanced. In the Datastore column, select a destination for the configuration file and each virtual disk, and click Next.
  • Select a disk format and click Next:
  • Option Description
    Same as Source Use the format of the original virtual disk.
    If you select this option for an RDM disk in either physical or virtual
    compatibility mode, only the mapping file is migrated.
    Thin provisioned Use the thin format to save storage space. The thin virtual disk uses just as
    much storage space as it needs for its initial operations. When the virtual disk
    requires more space, it can grow in size up to its maximum allocated capacity.
    This option is not available for RDMs in physical compatibility mode. If you
    select this option for a virtual compatibility mode RDM, the RDM is
    converted to a virtual disk. RDMs converted to virtual disks cannot be
    converted back to RDMs.

    Thick Allocate a fixed amount of hard disk space to the virtual disk. The virtual
    disk in the thick format does not change its size and from the beginning
    occupies the entire datastore space provisioned to it.
    This option is not available for RDMs in physical compatibility mode. If you
    select this option for a virtual compatibility mode RDM, the RDM is
    converted to a virtual disk. RDMs converted to virtual disks cannot be
    converted back to RDMs.

    NOTE: Disks are converted from thin to thick format or thick to thin format only when they are copied from one
    datastore to another. If you choose to leave a disk in its original location, the disk format is not converted, regardless of the selection made here.

  • Review the page and click Finish.
  • A task is created that begins the virtual machine migration process.

References:

Linked Clones:
http://www.virtuallyghetto.com/2012/04/scripts-to-extract-vcloud-director.html
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1014249

Storage Motion Issue:
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2012122

How To’s sVmotion CLI/VCO style:
http://www.virtuallyghetto.com/2012/02/performing-storage-vmotion-in-vcloud.html
http://www.virtuallyghetto.com/2012/02/performing-storage-vmotion-in-vcloud_19.html
http://geekafterfive.com/2012/03/06/vcloud-powercli-svmotion/
http://geekafterfive.com/tag/vcloud/
http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-50/topic/com.vmware.ICbase/PDF/vsphere-esxi-vcenter-server-501-virtual-machine-admin-guide.pdf

Storage Considerations for vCloud:
http://www.vmware.com/files/pdf/techpaper/VMW_10Q3_WP_vCloud_Director_Storage.pdf

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vSphere 5 – Storage pt.1 VMFS and Provisioning

VMFS:

VMware® vStorage Virtual Machine File System (VMFS) is a high-performance cluster file system that provides storage virtualization optimized for virtual machines. Each virtual machine is encapsulated in a small set of files and VMFS is the default storage system for these files on physical SCSI disks and partitions. This File system enables the use of VMware® cluster features of DRS, High-Availability, and other storage enhancements.
For more information please see the following document here and the following KB here.

Upgrading VMFS:

There are two ways to upgrade the VMFS to version 5 from previous 3.xx. An important for when upgrading VMFS-5 or provisioning new VMFS-5 is that legacy ESX host will not be able to see the new VMFS partitions. This is because of the enhancements made into ESX and the partitioning. Upgrading VMFS-5 is irreversible and consider always what you are doing. Lastly, there are many ways to provision VMFS-5 these are just two of the more common ways of doing it.

Method 1: Online Upgrade

Although an online upgrade does give you some of the new features in VMFS-5 it does not give you all of them. However, it is the least impacting and can be performed at anytime without an outage. Below are the features you will not gain by doing an in-place upgrade:

  • VMFS-5 upgraded from VMFS-3 continues to use the previous file block size which may be larger than the unified 1MB file block size.
  • VMFS-5 upgraded from VMFS-3 continues to use 64KB sub-blocks and not new 8K sub-blocks.
  • VMFS-5 upgraded from VMFS-3 continues to have a file limit of 30720 rather than new file limit of > 100000 for newly created VMFS-5.
  • VMFS-5 upgraded from VMFS-3 continues to use MBR (Master Boot Record) partition type; when the VMFS-5 volume is grown above 2TB, it automatically & seamlessly switches from MBR to GPT (GUID Partition Table) with no impact to the running VMs.
  • VMFS-5 upgraded from VMFS-3 continue to have its partition starting on sector 128; newly created VMFS5 partitions will have their partition starting at sector 2048.

RDM – Raw Device Mappings

  • There is now support for passthru RDMs to be ~ 60TB in size.
  • Non-passthru RDMs are still limited to 2TB – 512 bytes.
  • Both upgraded VMFS-5 & newly created VMFS-5 support the larger passthru RDM.

The end result in using the in place upgrade can be the following:

  • Performance is not optimal
  • non-standards can still be in place
  • Disk Alignment will be a consistent issue with older environments
  • File limit can be impacting in some cases

Method 1: How to perform an “Online” upgrade for VMFS-5

Upgrading a VMFS-3 to a VMFS-5 file system is a single-click operation. Once you have upgraded the host to VMware ESXi™ 5.0, go to the Configuration tab > Storage view. Select the VMFS-3 datastore, and above the Datastore Details window, an option Upgrade to VMFS-5 will be displayed:


Figure 3. Upgrade to VMFS-5

The upgrade process is online and non-disruptive. Virtual machines can continue to run on the VMFS-3 datastore while it is being upgraded. Upgrading the VMFS file system version is a one-way operation. There is no option to reverse the upgrade once it is executed. Additionally, once a file system has been upgraded, it will no longer be accessible by older ESX/ESXi 4.x hosts, so you need to ensure that all hosts accessing the datastore are running ESXi 5.0. In fact, there are checks built into vSphere which will prevent you from upgrading to VMFS-5 if any of the hosts accessing the datastore are running a version of ESX/ESXi that is older than 5.0.

As with any upgrade, VMware recommends that a backup of your file system is made prior to upgrading your VMFS-3 file system to VMFS-5.

Once the VMFS-5 volume is in place, the size can be extended to 64TB, even if it is a single extent, and ~2TB Virtual Machine Disks (VMDKs) can be created, no matter what the underlying file-block size is. These features are available ‘out of the box’ without any additional configuration steps.

NOTE: Some documentation are excerpts and provided and used from VMware Documentation and Sources..

Method 2: Provisioning New VMFS-5

This method explains how to update VMFS without performing an “online” upgrade. Essentially this would be the normal process of provisioning a VMFS LUN for ESXi 5 or older. Here are the listed benefits of VMFS-5 provisioning without doing an “online” upgrade.

  • VMFS-5 has improved scalability and performance.
  • VMFS-5 does not use SCSI-2 Reservations, but uses the ATS VAAI primitives.
  • VMFS-5 uses GPT (GUID Partition Table) rather than MBR, which allows for pass-through RDM files greater than 2TB.
  • Newly created VMFS-5 datastores use a single block size of 1MB.
  • VMFS-5 has support for very small files (<1KB) by storing them in the metadata rather than in the file blocks.
  • VMFS-5 uses sub-blocks of 8K rather than 64K, which reduces the space used by small files.
  • VMFS-5 uses SCSI_READ16 and SCSI_WRITE16 cmds for I/O (VMFS-3 used SCSI_READ10 and SCSI_WRITE10 cmds for I/O).

Other Enhancements:

  • Disk Alignment for Guest OS’s become transparent and have less impact.
  • Performance I/O and scalability become a greater value to running online vs. new.

As you can see the normal provisioning of VMFS-5 is a lot more robust in features and offers a great deal of improvement to just performing an “Online” upgrade. The online upgrade is easy and seamless but for normal considerations all benefits should be considered. In my case the chosen Method would be Method 2. The only instance in which an “Online” upgrade would be considered under normal circumstances would be if you were already at capacity on an existing array. In this type of scenario it could be viewed as a more beneficial way. Also, if you did not have Storage vMotion licensed through VMware further considerations on how to migrate to the new VMFS would have to be made. Migrating workloads to new VMFS-5 would be a bit more of a challenge in that case as well. However this is not an issue under most circumstances.

Method 2: How To provision new VMFS-5 for ESXi

  1. Connect to vSphere vCenter with vSphere Client
  2. Highlight a host and click the “Configuration” tab in the right pane.
  3. Click on “Storage”
  4. In the right pane click “Add Storage” (See image)
  5. Select the LUN you wish to add
  6. Expand the Name column to record the last four digits (this will be on the naa name) In this case it will be 0039. Click “Next”
  7. Select to use “VMFS-5” option
  8. Current Disk Layout – Click “Next”
  9. Name the datastore using abbreviations for the customers name with the type of storage followed by the LUN LDEV (Yes, a standard). This example would be “Cust-Name”=name “SAN”=type “01”= Datastore Number “LDEV” = 0038. (cus-nam-san-01-1234)
  10. Select the radio button “Maximum available space” click > Next
  11. Click Finish and watch for the “task” to complete on the bottom of vSphere client
  12. After the task completes go to the Home > Inventory > Datastores
  13. Make sure there is a Fiber Storage folder created. Under that folder create a tenant folder and relocate the datastores in the new tenant name folder.
  14. After moving the folder you may need to provision this datastore for vCloud. Proceed to the optional method for this below.

Note: Some of the information contained in this blog post is provided by VMware Articles and on their website http://www.vmware.com

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